ghawth:

They have nothing which they can call their own except their transgressions.

—Karl Barth

(Source: veneratione, via qiyamanwaquoudan)

"And they shall abide in that which their souls long for."

Quran 21:102 (via sange-saboor)

(Source: yaseeneducation, via sange-saboor)

oilcrude:

"The Spirituality of Shi’i Islam", Amir Moezzi | Note on Prayer  p. 376

oilcrude:

"The Spirituality of Shi’i Islam", Amir Moezzi | Note on Prayer  p. 376

(Source: spiralcradle)

"Do not be like a candle which is a light for people but burns itself out. Take out the love of this world from your heart."

Hadith Qudsi ch. 14

(Source: shiaislam)

ghawth:

qiyamanwaquoudan replied to your photo
how do you get past quiddity and into existence in terms of experiencing things?

realize they’re not the same and train yourself to perceive things in that way (aka not necessarily as a quiddity) until it becomes habit. it’s so easy to look at trees or people or grass or cars and think “wow what a green tree,” or “wow how tall she is,” and realize the tree is not green, and x person is not tall. think about what a person is and think about that particular being accordingly, same with all other things that exist. don’t differentiate between inanimate or not, because that’s also a quiddity. i think once you get used to thinking this way at literally everything you see (and feel, like the wind - strong, cold, sharp, etc), your world changes and you get out of that stuck way of thinking that we’ve been taught since we were toddlers. we learn to associate colors with words and use that to describe things - same with shapes and grooves and cracks and bumps, but always try to see beyond that.

(via ghawth-deactivated20140829)

"In the beginning Reality was at once being, knowledge, and bliss (the sat, chit, and ananda of the Hindu tradition or qudrah, hikmah, and rahmah which are among the Names of Allah in Islam) and in that “now” which is the ever-present “in the beginning,” knowledge continues to possess a profound relation with that principal and primordial Reality which is the Sacred and the source of all that is sacred. Through the downward flow of the river of time and the multiple refractions and reflections of Reality upon the myriad mirrors of both macrocosmic and microcosmic manifestation, knowledge has become separated from being and the bliss or ecstasy which characterizes the union of knowledge and being. Knowledge has become nearly completely externalized and desacralized […]."

Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Knowledge and the Sacred, p. 1

(via ghawth-deactivated20140829)

"Woe is to every such Muslim who does not reserve time every Friday for learning about his religion and make it a habit to ask about his religion."

The Messenger of Allah (ص) al-Kafi v. 1, ch. 9, h. 5

(Source: shiaislam)

ghawth:

In Being and Time, death does not simply spell the end of existence, for in recognizing the undeniable certainty of one’s death, something else is revealed, something more fundamental is disclosed. One of Heidegger’s aims in Part I Division II of Being and Time is to formulate a more authentic mode of relating to death that goes beyond understanding death as the simple coming to an end of life or the final annihilation of all possibilities. This “more authentic” relation to death is a being-toward-death which Heidegger calls a “running ahead [Vorlaufen].” Because the certainty of my death is futural, because death will always come to me out of the future, my anticipation of death in the present makes me, so to speak, ahead of myself. I am thrown to the certainty of my own death, Heidegger would say. Insofar as I exist, I am running ahead of myself, because I am related to a futural possibility that is essentially always a “not yet,” namely, my death. “I will die, therefore I am,” to reformulate once again the Cartesian adage. Because I relate to the possibility of my death with resolute certainty, because what I can be most certain of in the world is that I will some day die, I am always already a being that is a being-toward-death. According to Heidegger, this being-toward-death is precisely what makes my being possible, for death is the most extreme possibility of my existence, my “ownmost potentiality of being [das eigenste Seinkönnen]” (BT, 232; SZ, 333 [250]). “I myself am in that I will die.” At stake for Heidegger, then, is to conceptualize death not as pure nothingness, but rather as pure possibility.

Dasein means that I am structurally related to this “not yet” that will always remain to be passed, and that this “unfinished” status is ultimately something like a gift of finitude, of being given. Hence, being-toward-death does not mean withdrawing or shrinking from death, as if one moves through life in an ever narrowing tunnel. Rather, it means understanding death in a higher sense: neither as an ominous imminence nor a self-nullifying event, of demising and perishing, but as possibility. “That I will die….”—this, for Heidegger, when attuned to the authentic comportment of a being-toward-death, is a relating to death which in fact returns me to my most proper self, to my most proper possibility. Being-toward-death opens Da-sein to a horizon and movement of possibility whereby I understand myself as running ahead, retrieving and finding comfort in what I was already always am, namely, “thrown possibility [geworfene Möglichkeit]” (BT, 135; SZ, 191). To put it as succinctly as we can, Heidegger’s radical reinterpretation of death thus amounts to something like the following: death is the absolute impossibility that makes my being there in the world possible. [x]

(via ghawth-deactivated20140829)

"Lustful desires are fatal diseases, and the best cure for them is acquiring patience against them."

Amirul Mo’minin Imam Ali ibn Abi Talib (ع) Ghurar al-Hikam p. 540, h. 6

(Source: shiaislam)

"'Blessed is he whose knowledge and practice, love and hate, acceptance and refusal, speech and silence, and words and actions are sincerely for the sake of Allah.'"

Imam Ali ibn Abi Talib [as]

Tuhaf al-‘Uqul, p. 100

(via ahlulbayt-saviour)

(Source: thelittlephilosopher, via durenajaf)